Roasting Almonds

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Comments


Bernie Ewing

Fantastic shot Harold - well executed with the macro. And the story - it was the title that caught my eye at first before I noticed the author - thank you for educating us uninformed. I shall never look at another millipede the same way again!

Harold Fleming

Thank you, Bernie! We're both informed now. I had no idea.

Jane LeBlanc

Love the colours and details. Nice job, Harold. Appreciate the story, too.

Harold Fleming

I find it amazing the things that grow on old stumps, beautiful in there own right. The Millipede does look good in that environment. Thanks, Jane!

Harold Fleming

I find it amazing the things that grow on some old stumps, beautiful in there own right. The Millipede does look good in that environment. Thanks, Jane!

Heather Mellon

He looks quite splendid here and it's interesting to know what an important role these little guys actually play in maintaining the ecosystem. A beautiful and informative image Harold.

Harold Fleming

Thank you, Heather! I have seen one of these before but I didn't know myself how much they do for the soil. If I hadn't taken the photo I probably would not have looked up the information.

Yves Langlois

Great macro shot Harold. That little beast is very beautyful. Hope I will encounter one this summer.

Harold Fleming

A tough one to get focus on the full length without shooting it from the side, Yves, but then you miss the head. I shot this at F14. Depth of Field is so short with the macro lens that I don't believe even F22 would have gotten it all in.

Yves Langlois

It is why I love doing the macro shots, the chalenge. We are always playing in the limits of the cam parameters.. So a nice shot is a real reward.

Harold Fleming

Thanks, Debra!

Description
Legs everywhere! This Millipede was rushing across the growth on an old stump. It is a cyanide-producing Millipede (Harpaphe haydeniana). When it is handled it puts off a smell of cyanide (roasted almonds). It has only one predator, the ground beetle Promecognathus laevissimus. Fortunately, this means that the millipede can perform its duty as a “macroshredder,” breaking up plant material and initiating the process of nutrient recycling in the soil ecosystem without having to worry about a whole host of predators. In fact, it plays such an important role in the process that it can be considered to be a “keystone” species.
Taken By
Harold Fleming
Taken On
June 3, 2021
Tagged
insect millipede centipede invertebrate animal worm
  • Focal: 100
  • Lens Model: EF100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM
  • Shutter speed: 0.0025 sec
  • Aperture: f/ 14

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