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Paul Westell

  • Joined November 18th, 2012
  • City Ladysmith, B.C.
  • Uploads 32
  • Comments 10

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Paul Westell commented on "Perseid Fire Tail" 2017-08-14 10:21pm

Good shot. This year I was skunked by smoke - then rain. Last year I captured many satellites but only a single short flash of meteor.

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Paul Westell commented on "Butterfly or Moth?" 2017-07-30 8:03pm

You're on the right track, but "hastasta" is a typo or transcription error.

"Argent and Sable Moth" is an alternate name for "Rheumaptera hastata" (Spear-Marked Black Moth), more commonly used in Britain.

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Paul Westell commented on "Butterfly or Moth?" 2017-07-28 8:56pm


Definitely one of the Geometrid moths.

It could be either of two closely related species: the "Spear-Marked Black Moth" (Rheumaptera hastata) or the "White-banded Black Moth" (Rheumaptera subhastata). There is considerable variation in the pattern of both and a conclusive determination requires close examination of an actual specimen or DNA analysis.

See this page for more information on both: http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/slow.php?plate=17.7&page=2&sort=h

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Paul Westell commented on "Sphinx" 2017-06-19 9:35pm

Some species of Sphinx Moth can be seen feeding in late afternoon and may be mistaken for hummingbirds.

I put up UV lights (a bug-light with the zapper disconnected) to attract moths, and photoghraph them "in situ". Be patient.

My favorite shooting combination is a 50mm lens, 12mm extension tube, and camera mounted floodlamp, all hadheld with no flash. A diopter can fog up on cold nights, but may be easier to use with some modern cameras..

Check here for range and flight time information on Sphinx moths and Saturniid moths:
"http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/slow.php?plate=20&sort=h"
"http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/slow.php?plate=19&sort=h"

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Paul Westell commented on "Landing Pad" 2017-06-03 12:00am

This is a Clymene Moth (Haploa clymene), one of the Erebidae or Tigermoths, which look to be common in your area. Clymene is a common name in Greek mythology, identified with 11 different individuals (see Wikipedia).

For more information on the Clymene Moth see:
the "Moth Photogtapher's Group" http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=8107
and "Bug Guide" http://bugguide.net/node/view/4371

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